The effect of a defendant's physical attractiveness on mock jurors' evaluation of sexually coercive tactics

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dc.contributor.advisor Pickel, Kerri L.
dc.contributor.author Kulig, Teresa C.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-02T14:26:03Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-02T14:26:03Z
dc.date.created 2012-07-21
dc.date.issued 2012-07-21
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/196143
dc.description.abstract Research has shown that attractive individuals are viewed more favorably than unattractive counterparts across different types of criminal trials, contributing to the belief that “what is beautiful is good” (Dion, Berscheid, & Walster, 1972). However, this research has not been replicated in cases involving sexually coercive tactics. In the present experiment, participants read a case file that included one of two (attractive or unattractive) digitally altered photographs of a defendant and one of two vignettes (physical or verbal coercion). They then completed a questionnaire about the case. The results indicated that more women than men found the defendant guilty, and jurors assigned significantly longer sentences to the defendant in the physical tactic condition than in the verbal tactic condition. In contrast to two of the hypotheses, the more attractive defendant was evaluated more harshly than the unattractive defendant and an interaction between attractiveness and tactic was not found.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Psychological Science
dc.subject.lcsh Interpersonal attraction.
dc.subject.lcsh Rape.
dc.subject.lcsh Jurors -- Attitudes.
dc.title The effect of a defendant's physical attractiveness on mock jurors' evaluation of sexually coercive tactics en_US
dc.title.alternative Effect of attractiveness on sexually coercive tactics
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1678574


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  • Master's Theses [5358]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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