The golden thread : exploring the resistance to digital literacies and digital literacy practices by second-generation back-to-the-landers

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dc.contributor.advisor Grutsch McKinney, Jackie
dc.contributor.author Romano, Laura Palange
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-28T15:49:46Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-28T15:49:46Z
dc.date.issued 2014-07-19
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/198443
dc.description.abstract This project looks at the resistance to digital technologies and digital literacy practices by families that deliberately choose to live without the technologies that many would consider essential to daily life. I examine this resistance, and study the ways that uses of digital technologies and digital composing processes are intertwined with identity. In order to explore this topic, I conducted oral history interviews and used ethnographic observation to study twelve participants; members of seven different families, all from the state of Maine. My participants, all of whom self-identify as people who consciously do not use or limit their use of digital technologies, engaged with digital technologies to varying degrees, from members of a family who live “off the grid,” choosing to not use electricity, telephones, televisions, or the Internet, to a family that uses computers, the Internet and cell phones in the home, but limits the children’s use of these technologies. All of the participant families engage regularly in non-digital literacy practices, whether they be the playing of music, the sharing of recipes, or the contribution to or publication of a community newsletter. For all of the research participants in this study, an identity formed by the rejection of digital or electronic technologies is important. Each participant represents him or herself as one who rejects or avoids digital technologies, even though my research reveals that digital technologies are, indeed, used in some way by most participants. This is a study that is timely, as we are currently in an unprecedented age of digital technology use, and many people wonder about the effects of such immersion. Additionally, many families are trying to negotiate the extent to which the use of digital technologies is beneficial to their children, and the data gathered during this study speaks to this. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of English
dc.subject.lcsh Information technology -- Social aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Information literacy -- Social aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Families -- Maine
dc.subject.lcsh Urban-rural migration -- Maine
dc.title The golden thread : exploring the resistance to digital literacies and digital literacy practices by second-generation back-to-the-landers en_US
dc.title.alternative Title on signature form: The golden thread : exploring the resistance of digital technologies and digital literacy practices by second-generation back-to-the-landers
dc.description.notes Access to thesis permanently restricted to Ball State community only. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1769192


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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