Integral urban revitalization : integral analysis and application of integral theory as applied to sustainability and revitalization efforts of the Renaissance Pointe neighborhood in Fort Wayne, Indiana

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Motloch, John L.
dc.contributor.author Nelson, Catherine M.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-15T15:14:58Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-15T15:14:58Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05-02
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/199600
dc.description.abstract Sustainability is a widely used term in the world of design today, yet what this actually implies is highly dependent on the context in which it is used. For the purposes of this project there is an introduction to key topics including, Sustainability, Integral Theory, Integral Sustainability and how all of these topics are combined to analyze the Renaissance Pointe neighborhood, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. This neighborhood has been considered one of the most blighted areas in the city of Fort Wayne and revitalization efforts have been struggling to establish positive and catalytic changes in the neighborhood. This project applies the concepts of Integral Theory to the analysis of the existing revitalization efforts as well as current neighborhood conditions in order to find starting points for determining key integrally sustainable components that were missing or minimal in the overall “design” of current revitalization efforts. Design decisions and potential programming within the design elements were based on an integral or more holistic analysis including historical, cultural, social, economical, and environmental aspects of the neighborhood. An in depth look at the history and current conditions of the neighborhood through these integral lenses, also known as perspectives, serves to offer a more holistic and therefore more Integrally Sustainable foundation for site design and programming. The overall stigma of the Renaissance Pointe neighborhood is based on a negative history and perception. Therefore, aesthetic and security enhancements were determined to be a primary catalyst for stimulating initial change in perception of the area. Additionally, the lack of a “shared culture” represented by the lower left quadrant in Integral Theory supported the design of urban agricultural components and additional social gathering places and interactive and socially supportive programs within the design. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Landscape Architecture
dc.subject.lcsh Renaissance Pointe (Fort Wayne, Ind.)
dc.subject.lcsh Sustainable urban development -- Indiana -- Fort Wayne.
dc.subject.lcsh Community development -- Indiana -- Fort Wayne.
dc.title Integral urban revitalization : integral analysis and application of integral theory as applied to sustainability and revitalization efforts of the Renaissance Pointe neighborhood in Fort Wayne, Indiana en_US
dc.type Creative project (M.L.A.), 6 hours.
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.L.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1789407


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Creative Projects [3230]
    Creative projects submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account