Bits of Christ : an archaeochemical pigment analysis of a Medieval sculpture of Christ

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dc.contributor.advisor Lang, Patricia L.
dc.contributor.author Noneman, Heidi Fawne
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-15T19:19:02Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-15T19:19:02Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05
dc.identifier.other A-364
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/199801
dc.description.abstract The middle Ages lasted from 500 AD through 1500. Fascination with Medieval religious depictions, advancements in science and exploration during the Age of Discovery, and the evolution of artistic techniques during the Renaissance continue to interest scholars and artists today. Much is known about major trends of these evolutions in science, art, and religion through the diligent qualitative work of artists, historians, and scholars. What if this qualitative analysis could be performed in tandem with quantitative analysis? How much more could we understand about historical trends and Medieval Religious art in particular? Advancements in spectroscopic analytical techniques within the field of chemistry, for example, can confirm the types of pigments used on art pieces. These known pigments can then be connected to historic periods of artistic use, thus confirming or identifying a date range in which an artistic piece would have been created. I demonstrate the value of this type of interdisciplinary research through the chemical, archaeological, and historical analysis of the Medieval Christ sculpture currently housed in the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Chemistry.
dc.title Bits of Christ : an archaeochemical pigment analysis of a Medieval sculpture of Christ en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis.
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1777477


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5928]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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