Congress & new media : a data driven study of congressional public relations

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dc.contributor.advisor Reagan, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.author Smith, Brian J.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-06T16:07:46Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-06T16:07:46Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12-19
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/200100
dc.description.abstract The primary focus of this study aims to provide a comprehensive time series analysis of the United States Congress and the extent to which supporting congressional staff have been relied upon to deliver modern public relations strategies involving New Media. Supporting data and related research suggests that turnover activity for legislative seats in the House and Senate have continually introduced a higher concentration of official press functions with each proceeding session of Congress among individual members, standing committees, and leadership offices (though not proportionally). Through an extensive collection and examination of congressional disbursement records, this study explores the hierarchical concentration of New Media skillsets identified as the primary function for press staff supporting key congressional groups. The findings of this study offer evidence to congressional researchers regarding the extent of New Media messaging developed and managed by congressional staff members servicing each of the national parties as well as individual political actors.The primary focus of this study aims to provide a comprehensive time series analysis of the United States Congress and the extent to which supporting congressional staff have been relied upon to deliver modern public relations strategies involving New Media. Supporting data and related research suggests that turnover activity for legislative seats in the House and Senate have continually introduced a higher concentration of official press functions with each proceeding session of Congress among individual members, standing committees, and leadership offices (though not proportionally). Through an extensive collection and examination of congressional disbursement records, this study explores the hierarchical concentration of New Media skillsets identified as the primary function for press staff supporting key congressional groups. The findings of this study offer evidence to congressional researchers regarding the extent of New Media messaging developed and managed by congressional staff members servicing each of the national parties as well as individual political actors. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Political Science
dc.subject.lcsh Social media.
dc.subject.other United States. Congress -- Officials and employees.
dc.subject.other United States. Congress -- Public relations.
dc.title Congress & new media : a data driven study of congressional public relations en_US
dc.title.alternative Congress and new media : a data driven study of congressional public relations en_US
dc.title.alternative Congress and new media
dc.type Research paper (M.A.), 3 hours.
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1811068


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  • Research Papers [5068]
    Research papers submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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