Bystander intervention in intimate partner violence between same-sex partners : what predicts intentions to help?

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dc.contributor.advisor Gerstein, Lawrence H.
dc.contributor.author Elder, Emily Marie
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-26T18:30:24Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-26T18:30:24Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-23
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/200287
dc.description.abstract This study represents a first attempt at modifying existing interpersonal partner violence (IPV) bystander intervention measures to apply to same-sex IPV as well as an initial examination of what predictors are important when determining a participant’s intentions to intervene in a same-sex IPV situation. Latané and Darley’s (1970) bystander model was used as a framework to guide this study. A total of 293 male and female students at a Midwestern university completed surveys developed to measure various factors regarding same-sex IPV including awareness of same-sex IPV, involvement in IPV awareness or prevention efforts, feelings of responsibility for stopping IPV, and efficacy to intervene and intentions to intervene in IPV situations involving friends and strangers. Factor analyses were conducted on students’ responses to the modified measures. Results supported the validity and reliability of these scales. Following the factor analyses, multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of different variables when predicting participants’ intentions to help friends (who are lesbian or gay) and strangers (who are lesbian or gay). Overall, the strongest predictor of intentions to help in IPV situations involving lesbians and gay men as well as for both friends and strangers was bystander efficacy. Other significant predictors included participants’ feelings of responsibility to stop same-sex IPV, awareness of same-sex IPV, being involved in same-sex IPV prevention efforts or programs, and being female. It should be noted, however, that these predictors were not consistently significant across each model. The results and their implications for research, practice, and program development and implementation are discussed in light of prior research on IPV bystander interventions. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
dc.subject.lcsh Bystander effect.
dc.subject.lcsh Same-sex partner abuse.
dc.title Bystander intervention in intimate partner violence between same-sex partners : what predicts intentions to help? en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1823764


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3194]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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