Examining the impact of a motivational manipulation on college students' self-regulated learning strategies and academic performance

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dc.contributor.advisor Cassady, Jerrell C.
dc.contributor.author Martynowicz, Michael J.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-27T20:33:52Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-27T20:33:52Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05-05
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201109
dc.description.abstract This two-phase experimental study examined the impact of a motivational manipulation on undergraduate college students’ study behaviors, academic performance, and cognitive appraisals. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions prior to phase one: control group, practice testing training group (PTTG), and practice testing training plus motivational manipulation group (PTMG). Participants in the PTTG were shown how to use an active, self-regulated learning strategy (e.g., practice testing), while those in the PTMG also learned about its’ efficacy. Students in each condition self-selected a target assessment (e.g., exam or test) and tracked their preparation over a four-week period; they also completed a satisfaction inventory that provided evidence of self-reflection after the assessment. Longitudinal measures addressing students’ self-efficacy for learning, motivation to use practice testing, and expository text passage comprehension were also incorporated. The findings indicate that when training is accompanied by an additional motivational component (illustrating that a learning strategy is effective), the impact on students’ study behaviors, satisfaction with chosen learning strategies, and self-efficacy for learning is positive. This intervention promoted the selection and use of active, self-regulated learning strategies in an authentic learning context.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Psychology
dc.subject.lcsh Expectation (Psychology)
dc.subject.lcsh Regulatory focus (Psychology)
dc.subject.lcsh Active learning.
dc.subject.lcsh Test-taking skills.
dc.subject.lcsh Educational tests and measurements.
dc.title Examining the impact of a motivational manipulation on college students' self-regulated learning strategies and academic performance en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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