The psychological well-being of missionary kids

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dc.contributor.advisor Bowman, Sharon L., 1960-
dc.contributor.author Key, Alicia Michelle
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-18T19:18:37Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-18T19:18:37Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07-21
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201250
dc.description en_US
dc.description.abstract This study has presented an overview of the factors relating to the psychological wellbeing of missionary kids (MKs) after they return from the mission field to the culture designated by their passport. Past literature addressing MK well-being was reviewed and it was determined attachment with parents, experiences of trauma, cultural adaptation, and social support were prominent factors in MK adjustment and well-being. Multiple regression testing was utilized to examine how these factors predicted levels of psychological distress amongst a sample of 204 adult MKs currently living in their passport culture. Results indicated these variables, together, significantly predicted MK psychological distress (p=.000). Attachment, cultural adaptation, and social support each significantly contributed to this prediction, while trauma experience did not. Implications of these findings were discussed and need for future research explored. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology, Social Psychology and Counseling
dc.subject.lcsh Children of missionaries -- Psychology.
dc.subject.lcsh Third-culture children -- Psychology.
dc.subject.lcsh Reverse culture shock.
dc.title The psychological well-being of missionary kids en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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