Exposure to videotaped police interactions and cultural mistrust among blacks : exploring trust in news media and black identity centrality

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dc.contributor.advisor Littleford, Linh N.
dc.contributor.author Beutlich, Marcy R.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-19T15:16:51Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-19T15:16:51Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07-21
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201264
dc.description.abstract Researchers have yet to examine how interactions between Blacks and police officers in the media affect Black viewers’ psychological functioning. I examined the relationship between exposure to police interactions in news media and the endorsement of cultural paranoia symptoms as well as the effects of trust in news media and Black identity on the relationship between police interactions and cultural mistrust. I randomly assigned 153 self-identified Black/African Americans (68% female, mean age of 28.72 years) to watch one of three 5-minute video clips (e.g. positive, negative, or neutral interactions). Participants then completed a survey. Contrary to the study’s hypothesis, exposure to the different video conditions did not affect participants’ cultural mistrust scores. However, the results revealed that Blacks who trusted the news media and who had greater Black identity centrality reported feeling more cultural mistrust. The study’s contributions to the literature and implications for this study on clinical practice and media representation are discussed. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Psychological Science
dc.subject.lcsh Police -- Press coverage.
dc.subject.lcsh Police-community relations.
dc.subject.lcsh African Americans -- Attitudes.
dc.subject.lcsh African Americans -- Psychology.
dc.title Exposure to videotaped police interactions and cultural mistrust among blacks : exploring trust in news media and black identity centrality en_US
dc.title.alternative Media exposure and cultural mistrust en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.) en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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