Behind the screen : an exploration of college students' practice of intellectual self-efficacy in computer lab classrooms

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dc.contributor.advisor Ford, Karen
dc.contributor.author Cash, Cynthia S.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-06T16:37:14Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-06T16:37:14Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12-15
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201481
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study is to explore how undergraduate students’ belief in their knowledge impacts their learning while sitting behind a computer screen. While more and more traditional classrooms have computers (personal laptops or computer labs) in schools and universities, instructors strive to implement active learning strategies that increase interaction and engagement in learning. Yet, the design of computer lab classrooms typically suggest individualized student work at the computer. In this mixed methods research, the quantitative data explored undergraduate students’ perception of engagement, interaction, and self-efficacy in computer lab classrooms. The qualitative observation data presents students’ interactions in the classroom in order to provide further analysis and allow students’ to define engagement in three computer lab classrooms, arranged differently by rows. The triangulation of the data sets provides further cross verification of students’ perceptions regarding engagement and interactions that contribute to a student’s self-efficacy in a computer lab classroom. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Studies
dc.subject.lcsh Learning -- Social aspects.
dc.subject.lcsh College students -- Psychology.
dc.subject.lcsh School decoration.
dc.subject.lcsh Computer-assisted instruction.
dc.title Behind the screen : an exploration of college students' practice of intellectual self-efficacy in computer lab classrooms en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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