The influence of burn season on small mammal abundance in tall grass prairies

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dc.contributor.advisor Carter, Timothy C.
dc.contributor.author Gavenda, Kaitlin
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-24T18:49:40Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-24T18:49:40Z
dc.date.issued 2019-05-04
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201890
dc.description.abstract Understanding exactly how prescribed burns affect prairie habitat is important to many land managers. While much of the differences between burn and no burn have been researched, there has been less work on the differences between the different seasons of prescribed burns. What research there is primarily focuses on plant species and structure change. However, these changes do not always show direct changes in animal populations. In this study, I examined how the different burn seasons changed small mammal populations at Cooper Farm in Muncie, IN. I found that Deer Mice and White-footed Mice (Peromyscus sp.) were not affected by the season, but Meadow Voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were found more frequently in growing season burn plots. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.subject.lcsh Biology.
dc.title The influence of burn season on small mammal abundance in tall grass prairies en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5928]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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