Good game, well played : the toxic effect of competitive video games

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Ballenger, Amanda
dc.contributor.author Coleman, Robert J.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-30T17:08:45Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-30T17:08:45Z
dc.date.issued 2019-07-20
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201987
dc.description.abstract Video games are a wonderful way to pass the time. When done in moderation, they can lead to increased hand-eye coordination, higher critical thinking skills, and can even expand social circles. Online video games, however, are a modern parent’s worst nightmare. Multiplayer video games with an ESRB rating of Teen or even Everyone can easily turn out to have Mature situations because of one simple reason: players must interact with total strangers in order to enjoy the game. Toxic environments are generated through a combination of relying on ELO for player self-identification and various scenarios created by problem players. Although competitive video games can be directly related to sports in many cases, including issues with problem players, the same deterrents and punishments may not be applicable. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.subject.lcsh Health.
dc.title Good game, well played : the toxic effect of competitive video games en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5772]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account