The effects of joint mobility and stability on pain levels in Division I collegiate gymnasts

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dc.contributor.advisor Winfrey-Kovell, Mary
dc.contributor.author Wiley, Haley
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-04T19:57:11Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-04T19:57:11Z
dc.date.issued 2019-12-14
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202096
dc.description.abstract There are varied reports in the literature linking joint movement dysfunction or imbalances and overuse injuries from repeated sport participation over a prolonged period of time. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between mobility and stability of collegiate gymnasts and their pain ratings during a competitive season. The study was conducted with 19 female collegiate gymnasts. Prior to the beginning of the competitive gymnastics season, each participant completed a pre-test that included four out of seven Functional Movement Screen (FMS) assessments as well as the Thomas Test. During the competitive season, each subject rated their pain over the course of 10 weeks. At the end of the gymnastics season, the same assessments were then completed as the post-test. Average FMS scores as well as Thomas Test pass or fail ratings were compared to average pain data to determine that there was a significant correlation between the post-test FMS scores and the overall average pain data. No other significant correlations were found. Overall, while some trends were found between some FMS scores, Thomas Test scores, and the pain data, there was only a significant correlation between the post-test FMS scores and the overall average pain. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.subject.lcsh Kinesiology.
dc.title The effects of joint mobility and stability on pain levels in Division I collegiate gymnasts en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors theses
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5615]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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