Reading with SOAR : an investigation of the individual components

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dc.contributor.advisor Holtgraves, Thomas
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Somer R.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-10T15:59:30Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-10T15:59:30Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05-02
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202162
dc.description Access to thesis permanently restricted to Ball State community only
dc.description.abstract Students typically do not utilize study strategies effectively. They fail to do any or all of the following: select important information from the text, organize their notes in nonlinear fashion, associate ideas with one another or with ideas from other courses, and regulate and monitor their learning (Daher & Kiewra, 2016). SOAR (Selection, Organization, Association, Regulation) is a newer study method that has theoretical advantages over other reading strategies because each step engages a specific cognitive process that is critical for learning (Jairam et al., 2014). The purpose of this study was to compare each of the components of the SOAR strategy and determine if they produce comprehension scores as good as, if not better, than the combined SOAR strategy. Undergraduates from a Midwestern university were trained on one of six study methods: Selection, Organization, Association, Regulation, SOAR, or Rereading. Participants completed a reading phase, a study phase, and a testing phase. Results showed that SOAR studiers outperformed all other studiers, with the exception of Regulation on the fact test, but not the concept and relationship tests. Additionally, metacognition scores were not correlated with comprehension scores. This work has applied and theoretical significance. Because students are reluctant to complete assigned readings (Febriani et al., 2018), the likelihood of them completing all four steps of the SOAR strategy was low, even with its proven effectiveness. Future research should aim to provide students with reading interventions that maximize comprehension and efficiency, while also increasing students’ willingness to use those interventions. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Psychological Science
dc.subject.lcsh Reading comprehension -- Study and teaching (Higher).
dc.subject.lcsh Study skills.
dc.title Reading with SOAR : an investigation of the individual components en_US
dc.title.alternative Reading with selection, organization, association, regulation : ǂb an investigation of the individual components
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.) en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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