Ventilatory threshold and all-cause mortality in apparently healthy adults

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dc.contributor.advisor Harber, Matthew P.
dc.contributor.author Riccardi, Matthew P.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-12T19:10:50Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-12T19:10:50Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05-02
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202185
dc.description Access to thesis permanently restricted to Ball State community only en_US
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: VO2max is well established to have a strong relationship to all-cause mortality, however, ventilatory threshold is emerging as a novel variable for predicting outcomes in some populations. PURPOSE: To examine the relationship between ventilatory threshold and all-cause mortality in apparently healthy men and women. METHODS: 1440 participants (760 men, 680 women) from the Ball State Adult Fitness Longitudinal Lifestyle Study (BALL ST) cohort with a mean age of 45.4±13.0 years performed maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing to assess VO2max and ventilatory threshold (VT) between January 1992 and December 2016. Participants were followed for an average of 15.5±8.4 years after testing for mortality endpoints. Cox proportional hazard models were completed to determine the relationship between VT and mortality, with VT as a continuous variable. RESULTS: During the follow-up period there were 104 mortality events. After adjusting for age, sex, CVD risk factors, and year of testing, there was a 29.8% (HR: 0.919, 0.870-0.970 95% CI) reduction in all-cause mortality risk per 1 metabolic equivalent higher VT (p<0.01), however, the relationship between VT and all-cause mortality was not independent of VO2max. Comparatively, for every 1 metabolic equivalent higher VO2max, participants were at a 22.4% (HR: 0.938, 0.902-0.976 95% CI) lower risk for all-cause mortality (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: Higher VT was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality in apparently healthy men and women but was not independent of VO2max. VT may have the ability to be used in the place of VO2max when being used to predict outcomes when a maximal exercise test is not available. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship School of Kinesiology
dc.subject.lcsh Respiration -- Measurement.
dc.subject.lcsh Mortality.
dc.title Ventilatory threshold and all-cause mortality in apparently healthy adults en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.) en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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