A wealth of knowledge: looking at the intersectionality of education and generational poverty

Cardinal Scholar

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dc.contributor.advisor Powell, Jason
dc.contributor.author Claypool, Tristan
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-24T14:26:08Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-24T14:26:08Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202629
dc.description.abstract America has long been hailed as the land of opportunity. However, in recent years we have experienced unprecedented levels of income inequality and a widespread increase in the working poor. Despite the United States’ long held belief of the self-made, thriving family, today’s world paints a much different picture. I put together ideas and statistics from books such as Corporations are not People, The Big Squeeze, and The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, scholarly articles, and information I learned firsthand from my recent work with Beneficence Family Scholars, a nonprofit operating in Muncie, Indiana. Throughout the paper I lay out the case for why we have a systemic problem with how we treat the poor in the United States and how making education more accessible allows individuals and communities to escape the shackles of generational poverty. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.title A wealth of knowledge: looking at the intersectionality of education and generational poverty en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5761]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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