Comparing Mississippian and Fort Ancient lithic strategies at two late prehistoric sites: Lawrenz Gun Club (11CS4) and Reinhardt (33PI880)

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dc.contributor.advisor Nolan, Kevin C.
dc.contributor.author Szmutko, Cecilia
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-10T19:15:04Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-10T19:15:04Z
dc.date.issued 2021-05-07
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202750
dc.description Access to thesis restricted until 05/2022. en_US
dc.description.abstract This research addresses the cultural similarities and differences between Mississippian and Fort Ancient lithic industries by comparing two contemporary Late Prehistoric period sites, the Lawrenz Gun Club site (11Cs4), a fortified Mississippian village, and the Reinhardt site (33Pi880), a Middle Fort Ancient village. Lithic strategies are examined, involving tool manufacture and raw material procurement, and whether the traits of either assemblage exhibit similarity. Lithic data was gathered from investigations at each site ranging from 2008 to 2015. Statistical analysis through a series of Χ2 testing was used to evaluate each tool assemblage composition based on four categories: expedient vs. formal tools and the use of local vs. non-local raw materials. Each site assemblage showed a higher ratio of expedient tools. Local raw materials were more prevalent at Lawrenz than Reinhardt. However, the Reinhardt tract was occupied as early as the Early Archaic, and materials labeled ‘exotic’ in this study may have been locally discarded by earlier residents. In most ways, the results of this study are consistent with typical Late Prehistoric period lithic industry. en_US
dc.title Comparing Mississippian and Fort Ancient lithic strategies at two late prehistoric sites: Lawrenz Gun Club (11CS4) and Reinhardt (33PI880) en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.) en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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