Trans individuals' perceptions of counselor effectiveness: an experimental analogue study

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dc.contributor.advisor Yuichung Chan, Jacob
dc.contributor.author Colbert, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-10T14:21:25Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-10T14:21:25Z
dc.date.issued 2021-07-24
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202833
dc.description.abstract The current study experimentally explores the effect of counselor characteristics on trans participants’ perceptions of the therapist’s general counseling competence. Specifically, this study utilizes an experimental analogue design in which participants were randomly assigned to a vignette in which counselor gender identity and connection to the trans community were manipulated. Gender identity was manipulated through the counselor disclosing whether they were ‘trans’ or ‘cisgender.’ Counselor connection to the trans community was manipulated by knowledge of and attendance of Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR). Additionally, participants’ levels of Internalized Transphobia (IT) was explored as a possible moderator between counselor-client gender identity matching and participants’ perceptions of the counselor’s general counseling competence as measured by the Counselor Rating Form-Short (CRF-S). The hypothesis that counselor-client gender matching would increase participants’ perceptions of general counseling competence was not supported in the current study. IT did not moderate the relationship between counselor-client gender matching and CRF-S scores. Counselor Connection to the trans community increased participants’ perceptions of the counselor’s general counseling competence. This finding highlights the importance of counselor connection and advocacy to culturally and advocacy related events when working with the trans community. Research, practice, and training and education implications are discussed. en_US
dc.title Trans individuals' perceptions of counselor effectiveness: an experimental analogue study en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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