Lighting design in classrooms: the role of the interior designer

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dc.contributor.advisor Angne Alfaro, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Al, Erin
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-10T19:14:36Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-10T19:14:36Z
dc.date.issued 2021-07-24
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/202850
dc.description Access to thesis restricted until 07/2022. en_US
dc.description.abstract Lighting design is an important element of the practice of the interior designer. The positioning, brightness, and color temperature of the lighting within a space can drastically impact not only the experiential aesthetics but also the health, safety, and welfare of the people within the space (BetterBricks, 2020; Veitch and Davis, 2019; Bedrosian and Nelson, 2017; Ballina, 2016). This thesis examines lighting design in an educational setting, specifically the high school classroom learning environment. By examining the execution of interdisciplinary collaborative lighting design of classroom spaces within three local high schools, this thesis explores the following questions: What should be the interior designer’s role in the process of lighting design for educational spaces? What specific ways can interior designers contribute to the interdisciplinary collaborative process of lighting design for the classroom setting? What are some specific considerations when planning the lighting design for the classroom setting? Through a combination of questionnaire surveys, on-site observations, and document reviews, this qualitative thesis explores where and how interior designers can use their skills of lighting design to fit into the delivery of professional design services for both client and the user. The thesis establishes recommendations for interior designers to clarify their role as lighting designers for the classroom setting. en_US
dc.title Lighting design in classrooms: the role of the interior designer en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.) en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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