Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health

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dc.contributor.author Petts, Richard J.
dc.date.accessioned 2022-04-29T14:59:12Z
dc.date.available 2022-04-29T14:59:12Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05-25
dc.identifier.citation Petts, R.J. (2018), Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 57: 109-122. https://doi.org/10.1111/jssr.12500 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/203013
dc.description This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Petts, R.J. (2018), Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 57: 109-122. https://doi.org/10.1111/jssr.12500, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jssr.12500. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited. en_US
dc.description.abstract Approximately 15–20 percent of pregnancies result in miscarriage, yet pregnancy loss remains a socially taboo topic and one that has received limited attention in the literature. Utilizing nationally representative longitudinal data from the NLSY97, this study examines the influence of miscarriage on mental health and whether this relationship is moderated by religious participation. Results from this study suggest that miscarriage is associated with lower mental health among women who also experience a live birth. Results also suggest that religious participation moderates the relationship between miscarriage and mental health; religion is more likely to lead to increases in mental health among women who experience a miscarriage than among women who do not experience a miscarriage. Overall, evidence suggests that religion may be an important coping mechanism for women who deal with pregnancy loss. en_US
dc.relation.isversionof https://doi.org/10.1111/jssr.12500 en_US
dc.title Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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