The relationship between womanist identity attitudes, cultural identity, and acculturation to Asian American women's self-esteem

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dc.contributor.advisor Bowman, Sharon L., 1960- en_US
dc.contributor.author Alarcon, Maria Cielo B. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:22:24Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:22:24Z
dc.date.created 1997 en_US
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1997 .A43 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/174738
dc.description.abstract The current study examined the interrelationships among womanist identity, cultural identity, acculturation, and self-esteem in 74 Asian American women who are currently enrolled in or who have graduated from a college or university in the United States. It was hypothesized that Internalization attitudes, cultural identity, and acculturation would predict self-esteem among Asian American women. It was also hypothesized that cultural identity (Ethnic Identification) and acculturation would be negatively correlated with each other. Results of the simultaneous multiple regression analysis indicated that Internalization attitudes and cultural identity were both significant predictors of self-esteem. Asian American women with higher levels of Internalization attitudes had higher levels of self-esteem, consistent with Ossana, Helms, and Leonard's (1992) study. Asian American women with higher levels of Marginal attitudes had lower levels of self-esteem. Results, however, yielded no significant relationship between acculturation and self-esteem. A correlational analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between cultural identity (Ethnic Identification) and acculturation, confirming Lee's (1988) assertion that acculturation decreases cultural identity. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
dc.format.extent viii, 79 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Asian American women. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Self-esteem in women. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Women -- Identity. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Asian Americans -- Ethnic identity. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Asian Americans -- Cultural assimilation. en_US
dc.title The relationship between womanist identity attitudes, cultural identity, and acculturation to Asian American women's self-esteem en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1063210 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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