The effects of group biofeedback training utilizing mercury finger thermometers and autogenic phrases on locus of control

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dc.contributor.advisor Wenck, L. Stanley (Lewis Stanley) en_US
dc.contributor.author Atherton, Judith Ann,1941- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:22:41Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:22:41Z
dc.date.created 1979 en_US
dc.date.issued 1979
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1979 .A84 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/174862
dc.description.abstract The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether or not biofeedback had a differential effect on students' locus of control. A secondary purpose was to determine if subjects were able to acquire skill in raising their skin surface (finger) temperature using simple, inexpensive mercury thermometers in a group setting.Subjects were eleventh and twelfth grade psychology students. The study was conducted during the spring of 1979. Subjects were administered the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children as a pre-test. Obtained scores from this measure were divided into a one-third split on ranges of internality. All subjects then received six thermal training sessions over a two week time span. Mercury thermometers were placed on the subjects' index fingers, and autogenic phrases were introduced. During each session of approximately twenty minutes, the subjects recorded their baseline and peak temperatures, Following six treatment sessions, the Nowicki-Strickland Scale was again administered to all subjects. A three by two analysis of variance with repeated measures was employed to determine significant differences between the subjects' pre and post mean raw scores on the locus of control measure and the mean increase in temperature on the initial and final treatment days. Sex differences on locus of control and treatment differential were investigated by means of a two by two analysis of variance with repeated measures. Hypothesis I, which stated no significant difference among the mean scores of the high, middle, and low internal groups on the locus of control measure, was rejected (F= 119.7; p <.01). An F ratio of 12,3 (p <.001) indicated a significant difference between the pre-and post-test mean scores on the locus of control measure, Thus, Hypothesis II was also rejected. Contrasts determined that subjects scoring in the middle one-third range of internality were most affected by the biofeedback training.An F ratio of 15.08 (p.<001) indicated a significant difference between the mean increase in temperature on the initial day of treatment and the same mean increase on the final day. Thus, Hypothesis III was rejected. Hypothesis IV was not rejected as no difference was found among the means of the three groups on the treatment increase measure. Contrasts determined that subjects scoring in the lower one-third range of internality were most successful in increasing temperature.Hypothesis V, which stated no difference between mean scores of males and females., on the locus of control measure was not rejected, An F ratio of 8.68 for the effect of the repeated measure of locus of control was significant at the .05 level across sexes, Contrasts determined that the difference was attributed primarily to female subjects.A significant difference across sexes on the repeated measure of tempeature increase was also found (F= 11,73; p.<01). Contrasts determined a significant F ratio of 11.26 (p-<.05) for males and 5.88 (:p<.05) for females. Thus, males, as a group, and females, as a group, had significant differences between mean temperature increase on the initial and final days.Within the limitations of the present study, several conclusions were made based on the statistical analyses of the data, Biofeedback training did alter one's locus of control, moving the trait in the direction of internality. The subjects did learn to increase their skin surface (finger) temperature using common, inexpensive mercury thermometers in a group setting.Recommendations were made for further study to include replication using an experimental control design, conducting the study over a longer period of time, and using more subjects, possibly elementary-age students. en_US
dc.format.extent viii, 141 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Biofeedback training. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Group relations training. en_US
dc.title The effects of group biofeedback training utilizing mercury finger thermometers and autogenic phrases on locus of control en_US
dc.title.alternative Effects of group biofeedback training. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/419312 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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