A comparison of the focus of attention performance of learning disabled students under computer and traditional presentation methods

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dc.contributor.advisor Merbler, John B. en_US
dc.contributor.author Bao, Qixin en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:22:50Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:22:50Z
dc.date.created 1990 en_US
dc.date.issued 1990
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1990 .B36 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/174931
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of computers can modify the focus of attention of learning disabled students in a matching task. More specifically, this study examined learning disabled students' performance (correct answers and response time for correct answers) when completing a task consisting of matching Chinese characters when presented under three display conditions: traditional card, static computer, and animated computer display.This study involved 42 subjects who were children with ages 9 through 11 and were randomly selected from a list of learning disabled students in the Muncie Community School District, Muncie, Indiana. They were in regular classrooms with special education servicing for learning disabled students. Subjects were randomly assigned into one of the three presentation methods.Previous research has shown that microcomputers have been successfully used in special education. Microcomputers can not only motivate learning disabled students to learn but also control many focus of attention related stimulus characteristics including brightness, distance between stimuli, number of stimuli, and the stability of a stimulus. Based on this research it was hypothesized: (a) that learning disabled students who visually match Chinese characters presented via static or animated computer screens would have more correct answers and have less response time for correct answers than learning disabled students who visually match Chinese characters presented via traditional cards; (b) that learning disabled students' performance in the animated computer condition would be better than that in the static computer condition; and (c) that learning disabled students' performance in these two computerized conditions would be better than that in the traditional card condition at different stimulus difficulty levels.A 3 x 5 analysis of variance with repeated measures and a Scheffe Multiple Comparison Test on Main Effects were used to analyze the data. The results of this study indicated that: (a) learning disabled students who were presented the matching task via computer screens did not demonstrate an overall improvement in focus of attention; (b) learning disabled students who were presented with the matching task via animated computer screen presentation did better than students under the static computer presentation at the easiest level of task difficulty; and (c) learning disabled students who were presented the matching task under the static computer screen presentation condition performed worse than students completing the task under the traditional card presentation condition at the easiest task difficulty level when dealing with simple tasks; and (c) that learning disabled students who were presented with Chinese characters via static computer screen might perform worse than students with traditional card presentation when completing simple tasks.The results from this study failed to completely support the main hypothesis that computerized instruction methods could improve learning disabled students' focus of attention. The possible explanations for the general unsuccessfulness of the computer conditions are that the testing materials in this study were not programmed in the sense of individualized rate and that there was no feedback regarding correct or incorrect responding or contingent reinforcement for the correct answers. Future studies should include systematic feedback for correct answers as well as computer conditions. Replication studies which use different stimuli from those of the current study to determine the generalization of the results should also be conducted. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Special Education
dc.format.extent vi, 111 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Learning disabled children -- Education. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Computer-assisted instruction. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Attention in children. en_US
dc.title A comparison of the focus of attention performance of learning disabled students under computer and traditional presentation methods en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/720298 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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