Roger Branigan, governor of Indiana : the view from within

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dc.contributor.advisor Edmonds, Anthony O. en_US
dc.contributor.author Beasley, John Byron, 1944- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:00Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:00Z
dc.date.created 1972 en_US
dc.date.issued 1972
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1972 .B4 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175005
dc.description.abstract The political career of Roger Branigin, Governor of Indiana from 1965 to 1969, was the subject of this study. For the most part, the work is an oral history. The writer dealt with four main themes of the Branigin administration, his activities in the area of educational reform, and his participation in the 1968 primary.Branigin dealt, at one time or another, with several of the social issues that confronted political leaders throughout the nation. For example, the General Assembly passed measures that would have legalized abortion and abolished the death penalty. The Governor vetoed both items. Highway safety was an issue that received top priority from Branigin. At his urging, the most widesweeping legislation in the state's history was passed. In the area of prison reform, Branigin was an activist governor. Through executive decree and countless hours spent reviewing the files of the imprisoned, Branigin advanced the cause of Hoosier prisoners. Finally, Branigin was an activist governor in the area of conservation, expanding the state's park system and dealing with the issues of clean air and water.The tone of the Branigin administration was set by his fiscal policies. Because of the inauguration of the sales tax in 1963, the Branigin administration had more money available than any previous administration. But while Branigin spent a great deal of money, he spent it frugally. In addition, he attempted to eliminate waste in government. As a result, he ended the practice of full maintenance and placed a ceiling of one trip per person per year on travel costs.Much of Branigin's activity in the area of educational reform revolved around efforts to cut back on fiscal excess. For example, at his urging a programmatic budgeting procedure was implemented which ensured a full and open disclosure of the fiscal policies of the state universities. In addition, he was able to enact legislation which required university foundations to open their books to the State Board of Accounts. Finally, Branigin succeeded in establishing the Hoosier Scholarship Commission, which provided grants with no strings attached to needy and talented students.Shortly before leaving office, Branigin participated in the 1968 presidential primary. This participation stemmed from an agreement between the Hoosier Governor andPresident Johnson. Branigin, on the one hand, wantedto upgrade Indiana's political posture; Johnson wanted Branigin to run as a stand-in candidate. As a result, Branigin agreed to participate in the primary after Johnson consented to fulfill twenty-one Branigin proposals. Johnson's later decision to drop out of the contest blunted Branigin's political clout. Branigin still ran well, though, defeating Senator Eugene McCarthy but coming in second behind Senator Robert Kennedy.As governor, Branigin tended to be guided by a conservative political philosophy. Thus, he refused to encroach upon the doctrine of" the separation of powers. In fulfilling his duties as the state's chief executive, though, he was a dynamic leader. en_US
dc.format.extent iv, 267 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Indiana -- Politics and government. en_US
dc.subject.other Branigan, Roger Douglas, 1902- en_US
dc.title Roger Branigan, governor of Indiana : the view from within en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/417259 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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