The relationship of achievement motivation and academic achievement with externalizing and internalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children

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dc.contributor.advisor Wenck, L. Stanley (Lewis Stanley) en_US
dc.contributor.author Biggs, Patrick F. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:14Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:14Z
dc.date.created 1989 en_US
dc.date.issued 1989
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1989 .B5 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175102
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between achievement motivation and academic achievement with externalizing (i.e., aggressive, acting-out) and Internalizing (i.e., Immature withdrawal) emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children. Furthermore, the mean difference in academic achievement of externalizers and Internalizers was examined. Analysis of variance, regression analysis, and t-test procedures were employed to analyze the data.Eighty-two subjects, in grades two through six, currently enrolled In special education programs for emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children, participated in this study. The Child Behavior Checklist-Teacher's Report Form (TRF), and the resultant Child Behavior Profile (CBP) were used to differentiate between externalizing and internalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children. Furthermore, the TRF yielded information on school performance and adaptive functioning. The Thematic Apperception Test of Need for Achievement (TAT), and the Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised (WRAT-R) were administered by the researcher to gather data on achievement motivation and academic achievement, respectively.In general, the children in this study showed little or no motivation for achievement. An analysis of variance, comparing externalizers and internalizers in achievement motivation was not significant. A regression analysis, controlling for Intelligence, showed no difference in achievement motivation between externalizers and internalizers. Knowledge of group membership (i.e., externalizing or internalizing) added little to the explained variance of academic achievement. After controlling for intelligence and achievement motivation, externalizers and internalizers showed no difference in mean academic achievement.On the basis of teacher ratings of adaptive functioning skills considered necessary for success In the classroom, more than 75% of emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children were rated in the clinical range. More than two-thirds of the children were rated below average in school performance. T-tests revealed no difference between externalizers and internalizers in adaptive functioning skills or school performance.ConclusionsBased on the results of this study, the following conclusions were drawn:Emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children are generally lacking in motivation for achievement.Externalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children, and Internalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children do not differ in motivation for achievement.Achievement motivation and academic achievement are not significantly related with emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children.Externalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children, and internalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children show no difference in mean academic achievement.5. Emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children are generally deficient in the adaptive functioning skills judged necessary for school success. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Psychology
dc.format.extent xi, 134 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Problem children -- Education. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Achievement motivation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Academic achievement. en_US
dc.title The relationship of achievement motivation and academic achievement with externalizing and internalizing emotionally and behaviorally handicapped children en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/720148 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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