Critical thinking skills in nursing students progressing through a nursing curriculum

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dc.contributor.advisor McElhinney, James H. en_US
dc.contributor.author Brigham, Carole Fiser en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:30Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:30Z
dc.date.created 1984 en_US
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1984 .B74 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175226
dc.description.abstract Are there differences among freshman, sophomore, junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students in levels of critical thinking skills? What demographic variables are related to critical thinking?Critical thinking was equated with the problem-solving process in the nursing process and defined as the ability to collect and interpret facts, develop problem statements, identify interventions and evaluate the outcomes.A stratified random sample of nursing students (N = 114) from freshman, sophomore, junior and senior classes completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal and a demographic questionnaire.No significant differences were found among the four grade levels in critical thinking skills (F = 2.506, p = .0628). Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) verbal and quantitative scores and grade point averages (r = .55, .30, .41 respectively) were positively correlated to critical thinking (p = .05). Age, total number of credit hours completed, credit hours completed In physical/earth/life sciences, behavior and social sciences, humanities and fine arts, professional nursing and general electives were also statistically significantly related (r < .30, indicates little practical significance) to critical thinking. SAT verbal, grade point average, humanities and fine arts entered a regression equation to collectively account for 41% of the variance in critical thinking (p = < .001).Either (a) critical thinking skills are not increasing, (b) the WGCTA does not measure the critical thinking skills used by nurses or (c) nursing curricula may not develop critical thinking skills in nursing students. using an analysis of the uniqueness of the nursing process, nurse educators should develop an instrument that measures the critical thinking "process" component of the nursing process as well as the "logic" component with items specific to the nursing knowledge base.If critical thinking skills are important to nursing practice, then curriculum content, teaching methodologies and learning experiences should increase critical thinking skills in nursing students. Longitudinal studies need to be conducted to determine what curriculum content, teaching methodologies and learning experiences are most effective in increasing the critical thinking skills in nursing students. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Center for Lifelong Education
dc.format.extent vi, 141 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing -- Study and teaching. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Critical thinking -- Study and teaching (Higher) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Problem solving -- Study and teaching (Higher) en_US
dc.title Critical thinking skills in nursing students progressing through a nursing curriculum en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/558370 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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