A study of the relationship between mixed eye-hand dominance and letter/word reversals in learning disabled and normal males

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dc.contributor.advisor Wenck, L. Stanley (Lewis Stanley) en_US
dc.contributor.author Brummer, Diana Willig en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:38Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:38Z
dc.date.created 1990 en_US
dc.date.issued 1990
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1990 .B78 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175284
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mixed eye-hand dominance and letter/word reversals in learning disabled and normal readers. Previous research had shown links between mixed dominance and reading disabilities, especially those disabilities related to visuo-spatial deficits. However, due to the different approaches to conceptualizing lateral preferences, the wide variety of methods used to assess laterality, and the heterogeneity of subjects exhibiting reading disabilities, many studies have been contradictory and inconclusive. This study was designed to: assess laterality on a continuum, investigate the specific area of mixed eye-hand dominance, and determine if there is a statistically significant relationship between the degree of mixed dominance and the specific reading problem of letter and word reversals.The research sample consisted of 53 learning disabled males and 44 males from regular education classrooms, randomly selected from a public school system in northern Indiana. Mixed eye-hand dominance was assessed by the General Laterality Factor and the Visual Activities Factor of the Lateral Preference Schedule. The degree of letter/word reversal difficulty was-determined by the Jordan Left-Right Reversal Test. Each subject was administered both instruments either individually or in small groups.The data was analyzed for statistical significance by computing Pearson product moment correlation coefficients. To compare the learning disabled readers and normal readers for significant differences in age and the degree of mixed eye-hand dominance, t tests were conducted. Two research questions were then addressed by examining the findings:Research Question #1: Is there a statistically significant relationship between mixed eye-hand dominance and letter/word reversal errors in learning disabled and normal readers? A statistically significant difference was found between the degree of mixed eye-hand dominance and reversal errors in the learning disabled group. No other statistically significant relationships were found.Research Question #2: Is there a greater degree of mixed eye-hand dominance in learning disabled students than in normal readers? There were no statistically significant differences between learning disabled and normal readers in the degree of mixed eye-hand dominance.It was concluded that there were no statistically significant relationships between mixed eye-hand dominance and reversal errors in normal readers or when groups of normal readers and learning disabled students were combined. There was, however, a statistically significant positive relationship between mixed dominance and reversal errors when learning disabled students were grouped separately. The greater the degree of mixed eye-hand dominance, the higher the reversal error score in learning disabled students.Attempts to develop more sensitive and reliable instruments to assess lateral preferences and specific reading problems were recommended. Additionally, studies investigating the relationship between lateral preferences and reading performance should continue. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Psychology
dc.format.extent 3, 75 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading disability. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Laterality. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Learning disabilities. en_US
dc.title A study of the relationship between mixed eye-hand dominance and letter/word reversals in learning disabled and normal males en_US
dc.title.alternative Mixed eye-hand dominance and letter/word reversals in learning disabled and normal males. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/720139 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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