Against the odds : literacy success in rural, low-income families

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dc.contributor.advisor Tancock, Susan M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Buckner, Brenda Warren en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:41Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:41Z
dc.date.created 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 2004 .B83 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175304
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to describe the literacy-related characteristics of the family and home environment that contribute to the development of siblings who are good readers from rural, low income status families.The case study research method was used in order to gather comprehensive and in-depth information about each informant that reflected the reality of the literacy influences. The case study further aided in the investigation of the complex social unit of the family, which consisted of multiple characteristics that influenced literacy attainment. Each case was analyzed in and of itself, and then a cross case analysis was conducted.Five family-related characteristics that influenced the literacy acquisition and attainment of the siblings emerged from the data analysis. The family value for books and literacy materials, evident through the abundance of materials placed in prominent places within the homes and through the careful storage of literacy materials, was evident in each family. Both families were characterized by an enjoyment for reading and writing, evidenced by the number of books each sibling read, trips to the library, reading aloud in the home, and child created written products. Family literacy practices such as discussions about books, a homework routine, regular trips to the library, and members of the family reading to each other were characteristics present in each of the case studies. Another characteristic evident in each of the families was their value for education. Parents expected the siblings to attend college. The siblings also expected that their graduation from college would improve their socioeconomic status. Each case study was also characterized by the presence of support systems that aided in the literacy attainment of the siblings.The siblings all had a love for books and literacy materials, as well as being persistent, responsible, and accountable in their efforts to attain literacy success. The children were intrinsically motivated to be successful, not only in school, but in life. Support and encouragement for literacy development through the home and school contexts were provided by the parents. Family support systems were also fundamental to the literacy attainment of the siblings. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Elementary Education
dc.format.extent vii, 250 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Rural poor -- Books and reading -- Case studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Rural families -- Books and reading -- Case studies. en_US
dc.title Against the odds : literacy success in rural, low-income families en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1290967 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3174]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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