The perceptions of the conference method of reporting to parents in a selected elementary school district

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dc.contributor.advisor Ballou, Philip E. (Philip Edwin), 1925- en_US
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Alan W. (Alan Warner), 1932- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:25:32Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:25:32Z
dc.date.created 1974 en_US
dc.date.issued 1974
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1974 .F47 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/176185
dc.description.abstract Throughout the history of American education there have been many procedures, methods and systems used in reporting pupil progress in school. It is important to appraise the perceptions of individuals directly involved when a change has been made or is contemplated.The purpose of the study was to identify the perceptionsof the students of the Fifth Street School, Connersville, Indiana, as well as the perceptions of the parents and teachers of the students in regard to the effectiveness of the parent-teacher conference method of reporting pupil progress in school.The review of literature revealed that the three basic methods of reporting pupil progress were written, oral, and a combination of the written and oral method. Several authorities believed that the face-to-face oral reporting method, between parent and teacher, to be an important part of the reporting of pupil progress.Interview guides were developed for the students, parents and teachers included in the study. All were interviewed separately and perceptions of the reporting systemnoted.The following major conclusions of the study were noted:1. Students learned what their individual strengths and weak nesses were during student-teacher conferences. Individual attention directed to each student by the teacher was a factor in motivating them to do their best work in school. When given a choice as to the method of individual evaluation they preferred, the majority chose the written report.2. Parents indicated satisfaction with the amount and kinds of information they received about their child from the parent-teacher conference method of reporting. The parents were equally divided as to their preference of receiving written or conference reports of pupil progress from the teachers.3. Teachers believed that the parent-teacher conference method was the best system to report pupil progress to parents. Difficulties in scheduling the conferences and the numberof conferences held with only one parent in attendance were noted. The teachers expressed a unanimous opinion in wanting to continue the teacher-parent conference method of reporting pupil progress to parents.There is no one best method to report pupil progress in school. Any school corporation desiring to change the method of reporting pupil progress should define the educational philosophy of the school system, have goals stated clearly, and provide a comprehensive training program for their teaching staff for maximum success. en_US
dc.format.extent iii, 92 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh School reports. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Parent-teacher relationships. en_US
dc.title The perceptions of the conference method of reporting to parents in a selected elementary school district en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/414749 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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