Music style preference : a ranking of musical styles and comparison by age, gender, ethnicity, music training, and rural, suburban, or urban upbringing

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dc.contributor.advisor Turner, Kristin M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Ginocchio, John F. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:25:58Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:25:58Z
dc.date.created 2006 en_US
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier LD2489.Z62 2006 .G56 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/176395
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to review the findings of Leblanc (1979) utilizing the most common styles of popular music in today's media. Seven styles of popular music, traditional jazz, and Romantic classical music were ranked in order of preference; subject responses were compared by age, gender, environment of upbringing, and amount and type of music training. The sample consisted of 332 fifth graders and college non-music majors. Subjects completed a Personal Information Form, listened to a recording of 19 musical examples representing the styles being studied, and recorded their preference for each on the Music Preference Inventory.Results indicated an overall decline in preference in comparison to Leblanc (1979). Preference responses indicated that fifth graders and college non-music majors ranked the music styles differently, although both age groups ranked pop rock music among the most preferred styles and country, traditional jazz, and Romantic classical music as the least preferred styles. Females recorded significantly higher overall music preferences than males and differed in their preference for individual music styles. Preferences for individual styles also varied depending on the environment in which subjects were raised. Overall music preference was significantly higher among subjects with more music training, and instrumental biases were found based on specific types of music training.The results of this study strongly suggest that popular music styles are the most preferred music styles. Furthermore, variables such as age, gender, and environment of upbringing influence preference for individual music styles in different ways. However, increased music training and specific types of music training positively influence overall music preference and increase preference for non-popular styles. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship School of Music
dc.format.extent v, 180 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Style, Musical. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh School children -- Songs and music. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College students -- Songs and music. en_US
dc.title Music style preference : a ranking of musical styles and comparison by age, gender, ethnicity, music training, and rural, suburban, or urban upbringing en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1336616 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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