Relationship of client satisfaction and client progress in therapy to similarities of counseler-client interpersonal values

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dc.contributor.advisor Dimick, Kenneth M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hurst, Jeffrey Allen, 1948- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:27:08Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:27:08Z
dc.date.created 1978 en_US
dc.date.issued 1978
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1978 .H87 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/176975
dc.description.abstract The purposes of this study were to investigate whether or not there was a significant relationship between client satisfaction and client progress with similarities of counselor-client interpersonal values and the amount of client change in interpersonal values during therapy.The research hypotheses were statistically tested under the null hypothesis form. The hypotheses are as follows:Hypothesis 1There is no significant relationship between client satisfaction and the amount of similarity of counselor-client interpersonal values.Hypothesis 2There is no significant relationship between client progress and the amount of similarity of counselor-client interpersonal values.Hypothesis 3There is no significant relationship between client satisfaction and the amount of change of client inter personal values.Hypothesis 4There is no significant relationship between client progress and the amount of change of client interpersonal values.It is noticeable that researchers disagree as to the best way to measure therapeutic outcome. Some research used the counselor as the evaluator. However, there does appear to be more support for the use of client evaluation particularly when combined with outside judges. In addition, it was noted that some clients get better in counseling, and yet, others become worse regardless of theoretical orientations. In the literature the subject of values has been approached but the issue of interpersonal value similarities has not.This study was conducted at the Ball State University Counseling Practicum Clinic in the Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services, Muncie, Indiana. The clientele for this research were made up of individuals in the community. All counselors were graduate students associated with the Counseling Practicum Clinic.Clients were given the Survey of Interpersonal Values (SIV) after the intake interview. Counselors were given the SIV during the first week of classes during the Summer Quarter. After the client had been assigned to a counselor, a raw score of difference was computed from the six scales on the SIV. During the fifth week of the Summer Quarter, the client's progress was rated on a Likert Scale by the assigned supervisor. The Likert Scale consisted of seven equally sized segments with one end continuum labeled "poor" and the other end labeled "improved." Client satisfaction was measured by the client answering the Inventory of Fulfillment of Client Expectancy (IFCE) during the fifth week of the Summer Quarter.The raw data equation of the Pearson product-moment coefficient of correlation (r) was used to treat the data. The necessary value of r for significance at the .05 level of confidence was 0.413 with a total N of 23 counselor-client pairs. Each counselor and client was assigned a score of difference obtained from the difference of their SIV scores. This score of difference was correlated with the client's score on client satisfaction and client progress. A low score of difference reflected a higher degree of similarity between counselor-client interpersonal values. After the client completed his/her final SIV, a score of difference was computed from the six scale scores on the initial SIV and the final SIV. The score of difference was correlated with the client's score on client satisfaction and client progress.Significance was found at the .05 level of confidence between client satisfaction and the lack of discrepancy of counselor-client interpersonal values.Significance was found at the .05 level of confidence between client progress and the lack of discrepancy of counselor-client interpersonal values. Statistical significance was not achieved between client satisfaction or client progress and the amount of change of client interpersonal values. en_US
dc.format.extent vi, 82 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Counseling. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Values. en_US
dc.title Relationship of client satisfaction and client progress in therapy to similarities of counseler-client interpersonal values en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/225464 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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