The effects of structured criticism upon the perceptual differentiation and studio compositional skills displayed by college students in an elementary art education course

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dc.contributor.advisor Spoerner, Thomas M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Janov, Dora R. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:27:15Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:27:15Z
dc.date.created 1986 en_US
dc.date.issued 1986
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1986 .J36 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/177038
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of specially designed instructional strategies utilizing an art criticism model upon the perceptual differentiation and compositional drawing skills of college students. The an elementary art education course.All subjects received instruction in the studio activities of drawing and painting during the ten week treatment period. The three experimental groups received additional instruction in art criticism.Instrumentation consisted of the Group Embedded Figures Test, a standardized measure of perceptual differentiation, and the Student Composition Rating Scale, a measure developed by the investigator to quantify judgments of five expert judges on compositional skills displayed in drawings. Each instrument was administered as a pre- and post-test for all groups.Three null hypotheses were tested which maintained no significant differences for perceptual differentiation or compositional drawing skills among the three experimental sample consisted of 86 students enrolled in four sections of groups or between the experimental and control groups. A fourth null hypothesis maintained no significant difference between field-dependent and field-independent subjects on compositional skills displayed in drawing. These hypotheses were tested using multivariate analysis of variance and covariance. The .05 level of confidence was established. Inter-rater reliability was computed and found to be high for pre- and post-test SCRS measures.Findings and Conclusions1. All groups experienced gains in skills of perceptual differentiation. This result suggests that involvement in concentrated art activities, whether limited to studio activities, or coupled with the more cognitive aspects of art criticism, has the potential for increasing the visual perceptual skills of college students.2. The experimental groups significantly outperformed the control group on compositional drawing skill.This result suggests that the art criticism model did assist in the development and utilization of compositional strategies.3. No significant difference was found in perceptual differentiation or compositional drawing skills among the three various approaches to the implementation of the art criticism model. It would appear that student involvement with the structured analysis matrix determining factor, rather than the focus of criticism, or the degree of student involvement.4. Students who display greater skills of perceptual differentiation also display greater utilization of compositional strategies in drawing. This finding supports earlier contentions regarding the relationship between perceptual differentiation and art production. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Art
dc.format.extent vii, 126 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Art teachers -- Training of. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Art -- Study and teaching (Elementary) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Art criticism. en_US
dc.title The effects of structured criticism upon the perceptual differentiation and studio compositional skills displayed by college students in an elementary art education course en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/479315 en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/uhtbin/catkey/1837925


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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