The effectiveness of a training workshop on burnout in nurses

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dc.contributor.advisor Hutchinson, Roger L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Kelley, Vincent D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:27:36Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:27:36Z
dc.date.created 1983 en_US
dc.date.issued 1983
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1983 .K4 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/177257
dc.description.abstract The effectiveness of a training workshop to combat burnout in nurses was investigated in this study. An attempt also was made to determine whether or not benefits of that workshop would be maintained over a three month period.Burnout is a phenomenon which affects those in the helping professions. Much has been written of a descriptive nature but little has been done to empirically determine procedures which might reduce burnout in those who are already experiencing it.Ninety-five staff nurses, representing two hospitals, volunteered to participate in this study. One hospital was a neuropsychiatric facility and the other was a general medical hospital.The dependent variable for this study was a burnout score as determined by the Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP). This is a 30 item self-assessment inventory, which addresses cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physiological reactions.Subjects were randomly assigned to either a treatment condition or a control condition. The experimental group attended a 7 ½ hour workshop which utilized didactic presentations, group discussion and problem solving, audio-visual material, self-assessment, training in progressive relaxation, an introduction to cognitive restructuring, and the development of social support systems.The research design chosen was a one-way or single factor design utilizing a test and retest of the SBS-HP. The method of data analysis was a one-way multivariate analysis of variance with a step-down F test. The selected level of significance was .05.The null hypothesis was not rejected. There was no significant difference between the treatment group and the control group on the long-term posttest after covarying the short-term posttest scores. Also, there was no significant difference between the treatment group and the control group on the short-term posttest. en_US
dc.format.extent 2, vi, 101 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nurses -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Burn out (Psychology) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Medical personnel -- Job stress. en_US
dc.title The effectiveness of a training workshop on burnout in nurses en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/415662 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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