Relationship between football practice self-efficacy and game performance

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dc.contributor.author Downey, Kevin en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:25Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:25Z
dc.date.created 2002 en_US
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier LD2489.Z9 2002 .D69 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180116
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between practice self-efficacy and game performance for football players. Self-efficacy can be described as task specific self-confidence. This was an exploratory study, there has been no previous research evaluating the relationship between practice self-efficacy and game performance for football players. However, previous research has evaluated confidence (self-efficacy) and its positive influence on performance, specifically within the sports realm (Gayton, Mathews & Burchstead, 1986, LaGuardia & Labbe, 1993, and Martin & Gill, 1995). This study also involves the aspect of practice and the theory of deliberate practice. There has been no research evaluating the relationship between deliberate practice and football performance. However, research has examined the influence of practice (deliberate practice) and performance in other sports. The amount of deliberate practice and performance have been shown to be directly related (Ericsson, et al., 1993).The participants in this study were a group of NCAA Division IA football players from a mid-western university (N=30). To address the purpose of this study, participants were asked to complete a task specific self-efficacy survey for football abilities; the football self-efficacy scale pertaining to specific practice sessions. The game performance was accessed using the Ball State Defensive Grading System. The research question asked if there was a relationship between practice self-efficacy and game performance for football players. The research question was analyzed using descriptive statistics, specifically a Pearson Product Moment Correlation over a seven week period. One week (week six) showed that the Pearson Product Moment Correlation was significant, and revealed a positive correlation between self-efficacy and game performance (r = .489, p<.05).The results of this study indicated that there is a potential for a relationship between practice self-efficacy and game performance for football players. Further research was needed to determine if there is a relationship between practice self-efficacy and game performance for football players. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent viii, 43 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Self-efficacy. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College football players -- Psychology. en_US
dc.title Relationship between football practice self-efficacy and game performance en_US
dc.type Research paper (M.A.), 3 hrs. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1238086 en_US


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  • Research Papers [5006]
    Research papers submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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