The relationship between task success and task liking and satisfaction

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dc.contributor.advisor Humm, Rodger D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Maslich, Howard Martin en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:35Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:35Z
dc.date.created 1971 en_US
dc.date.issued 1971
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1971 .M38 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180324
dc.description.abstract The relationship between task success and task liking and satisfaction was investigated. The independent success measure consisted of three anagram word lists representing different degrees of difficulty. The difficulty criterion was a function of word frequency in the English language, ranging from High - Moderate - Low. Success was measured by the number of correctly solved anagrams. Liking was measured by the semantic differential evaluative dimension. The lists were also rated on potency and activity dimensions. There were three seven-point polar adjective scales on each dimension, making a total of nine ratings per list. Findings statistically support the relationship between task success and task liking and satisfaction. The High frequency list produced the largest number of correctly solved anagrams and was rated as the most liked, most potent and most active. The Low frequency list produced the smallest amount of correctly solved anagrams, and was rated as the least liked, least potent and least active. Practical implications for education and industry as well as further research suggestions were discussed.
dc.format.extent 29 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Job satisfaction. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Success. en_US
dc.title The relationship between task success and task liking and satisfaction en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/415729 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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