A test of two hypotheses concerning the effects of manifest anxiety on the learning of multidimensional stimulus discriminations

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Humm, Rodger D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Smith, David W., 1947- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:35Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:35Z
dc.date.created 1971 en_US
dc.date.issued 1971
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1971 .S65 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180333
dc.description.abstract This thesis was designed as a partial test of two hypotheses concerning the effects of manifest anxiety on the learning of a concept formation task. The Taylor-Spence hypothesis has suggested that anxiety functions as a drive in the Hullian model relation drive to habit strength in a multiplicative manner. Taylor ahs devised the Manifest Anxiety Scale to measure this drive level. A review of the literature indicated inconsistencies in the results of studies dealing with complex human learning. Saltz has suggested an alternative hypothesis to account for the inconsistencies in the research results. The results of this study indicated that Saltz’ hypothesis was substantiated and is the more defensible of the two. An interpretation of the results, the limitations of this study, and suggestions for further research are discussed.
dc.format.extent v, 29 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Anxiety. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Motivation (Psychology) en_US
dc.title A test of two hypotheses concerning the effects of manifest anxiety on the learning of multidimensional stimulus discriminations en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/416384 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account