Student, teacher and parent perceptions of homework assignments at the high school level in White Plains, New York

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dc.contributor.advisor Park, Don L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Scaglione, Salvatore F. (Salvatore Ferdinand), 1932- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:44Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:44Z
dc.date.created 1974 en_US
dc.date.issued 1974
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1974 .S32 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180452
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of homework assigned to sophomore and senior high school students of White Plains High School, White Plains, New York, during a typical school day, and to determine certain parent, teacher and student reactions and expectations relative to those assignments. The subject areas for which homework assignments were studied in detail, and upon which correlations were made, were English, mathematics, social studies, and science.Instruments, specifically developed to correlate responses from three different groups were completed by 159 parents of students involved in the study, 54 teachers of the four subject areas indicated above, 505 sophomores, and 408 seniors. Two hundred and eighteen student response sheets which were electronically rejected because of deviations in responding techniques, were hand scored to obtain responses to specific questions. All other response sheets were tabulated electronically. Because of an insufficient number of responses, data gathered from the parent instruments were not used for statistical analysis.Data obtained from the various instruments were applied to the chi-square test of independence to determine rejection of null hypotheses.In applying data obtained from questionnaires to the chisquare formula, eight hypotheses were rejected and five hypotheses were not rejected. There was insufficient data to allow application of this formula to one of the hypotheses; one hypothesis, therefore, remains untested.The hypotheses that were rejected are:There is no significant difference in the amount of time that English teachers think that it takes students to complete assignments and the amount of time that students actually work on those assignments.There is no significant difference in the amount of time that mathematics teachers think that it takes students to complete assignments and the amount of time that students actually work on those assignments.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework between college-bound and non college-bound students.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework between sophomore and senior populations.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework between boy and girl populations.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework in the subject of English between sophomore and senior populations.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework in the subject of mathematics between sophomore and senior populations.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework in the subject of science between sophomore and senior populations.The hypotheses that were not rejected are:There is no significant difference in the amount of time that social studies teachers think that it takes students to complete assignments and the amount of time that students actually work on those assignments.There is no significant difference in the amount of time that homework is worked on in school between boy and girl populations.There is no significant difference in the amount of time that homework is worked on in school between sophomore and senior populations.There is no significant difference in the amount of time spent on homework in the subject area of social studies between sophomore and senior populations.The hypothesis that was not tested because of insufficient data is:There is no significant difference in the amount of time that science teachers think that it takes students to complete assignments and the amount of time that students actually work on those assignments.In general, the data indicate that girls tend to spend more time on homework than boys, sophomores spend more time on homework than seniors, college-bound students spend more time on homework than non college-bound students, and that there is a disparity between the length of time that teachers think that it will take students to complete an assignment and the length of time that students work on those assignments. en_US
dc.format.extent vii, 128 leaves : maps ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Homework. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Study skills. en_US
dc.title Student, teacher and parent perceptions of homework assignments at the high school level in White Plains, New York en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/415793 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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