Social, environmental, and spritual factors in college adjustment

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dc.contributor.advisor Dixon, David N. en_US
dc.contributor.author Schaffner, Angela D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:45Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:45Z
dc.date.created 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 2005 .S33 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180462
dc.description.abstract The primary purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sex, perceived social support from family and peers, negative life stress, psychological separation from mother and father, and spiritual well-being in predicting college adjustment. Additional goals of the study included examining the relationships between psychological separation from parents and spiritual well-being, as well as examining the influence of sex on perceived social support, negative life stress, psychological separation from parents, and spiritual well-being.The sample consisted of 100 undergraduate college students at a midsized, midwestern university. Participants completed a set of questionnaires, including a demographic questionnaire, Perceived Social Support Scale, Life Experiences Survey, Psychological Separation Inventory (Conflictual Independence subscale), Spiritual Well Being Scale, and Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire.The combination of the predictors in the study accounted for 33.9% of the variance in general college adjustment. Perceived social support from friends, spiritual well-being, and negative life stress were significant predictors (p<.05) of general college Social, adjustment. The combination of predictors in the study accounted for 31.9% of the variance in social college adjustment. Perceived social support from friends and spiritual well-being were significant predictors (p<.05) of social college adjustment.In addition, correlational data showed significant relationships between spiritual well-being and conflictual independence from both mother and father. Further, male sex was significantly, positively related to conflictual independence from father. Conceptual, research, and clinical implications are discussed. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
dc.format.extent v, 163 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Student adjustment. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College freshmen -- Psychology. en_US
dc.title Social, environmental, and spritual factors in college adjustment en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1317749 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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