Types of organizational structures, activities, and adviser compensation plans utilized within student councils in Indiana public senior high schools

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dc.contributor.advisor Wagner, Ivan D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Secttor, Jerome Michael en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:56Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:56Z
dc.date.created 1979 en_US
dc.date.issued 1979
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1979 .S43 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180602
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to determine the types of organizational structures, activities, and adviser compensation plans utilized within student councils in Indiana. public senior high schools. The population of the study was defined as all advisers of student councils in the 241 Indiana public senior high schools during the 1978-1979 academic year. The review of related literature and research revealed empirical data regarding the types of organizational structures, activities, and adviser compensation plans were either incomplete or outdated. Most of the literature was found to be subjective. The survey instrument was a 94 item questionnaire developed after reviewing related literature and consulting with a committee of experts. Two hundred-one student council advisers returned completed questionnaires. The following findings were based on analysis of data obtained from 201 questionnaires: 1. Fifty-five percent of the respondents had more than 12 years of teaching experience. 2. Forty-eight percent of the respondents had fewer than 4 years of teaching experience in the senior high schools in which the respondents were employed prior to appointment as student council advisers. 3. Sixty-seven percent of the respondents were considered members of teaching staffs. 4. Student members of 94 percent of the student councils were elected by popular vote of the students. 5. Seventy-nine percent of the student councils met during the regular school day. 6. Seventy-four percent of the student councils met at least once every two weeks. 7. Forty-four percent of the student councils were involved in the development of codes of dress and student conduct. 8. Forty-two percent of the student councils were involved in the formulation of school policy. 9. Twenty-one percent of the student councils were involved in in curriculum development and evaluation. 10. Advisers of 61 percent of the student councils reported receiving compensation for serving as student council advisers. 11. Advisers of 32 percent of the student councils reported receiving between $101 and $300 for serving as student council advisers. Advisers of 15 percent of the student councils reported receiving $100 or less for serving as student council advisers. 12. Advisers of 72 percent of the student councils reported devoting an average of less than 4 hours per week beyond normal school hours to student council responsibilities. The following conclusions, based upon the review of related literature and research and upon data from the study, were developed: 1. The organizational structures of a majority of student councils conformed to criteria established by experts for effective student councils regarding student representation, membership selection, frequency and time of council meetings, and the existence of written documents detailing responsibilities, authority, purposes, and aims of student councils. 2. Student council members were more likely involved in student social activities and student awareness activities than curriculum development or formulation of school policy. 3. Student council members in senior high schools with student populations greater than 2,000 were more likely to be involved in the formulation of school policy and codes of dress and student conduct than were student council members in senior high schools with student populations of 2,000 or less. 4. While a majority of student council advisers have 12 or more years of teaching experience, the assignment to serve as student council adviser has been given to teachers with few years of teaching experience in the senior high schools in which the advisers have been employed. 5. A majority of student council advisers received an amount of money specified in negotiated agreements as compensation for serving as student council advisers.6. Student council advisers believed the most appropriate compensation for serving as student council advisers was money. en_US
dc.format.extent 142 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Student government. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh High schools -- Indiana. en_US
dc.title Types of organizational structures, activities, and adviser compensation plans utilized within student councils in Indiana public senior high schools en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/262117 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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