Patient delay in breast cancer and fear of death and dying

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Carroll, Charles R. en_US
dc.contributor.author Pisney, Francis L., 1945- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:10Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:10Z
dc.date.created 1974 en_US
dc.date.issued 1974
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1974 .P57 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180822
dc.description.abstract This study has objectively assessed the role of fear of death and dying in a retrospective biased sample of 83 patients treated for initial breast cancer at Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, Indiana, 1972-1973.Increased delay is significantly associated with advanced clinical stage of breast cancer. No significant relationship exists between temporal delay and the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scales. Small positive correlations exist between delay and the Fear of Death Scales, The strongest fear is the fear of dying of self. Fear of death of self is significantly related to advanced clinical stage of breast cancer. Fear of death of others, fear of dying of self, and fear of dying of others are not significantly related to clinical stage of breast cancer. A significant linear relationship between age and temporal delay is present. Increased delay was not significantly related to other psychosocial variables tested. Tendencies to greater delay occurred with certain psychosocial variables.Advanced clinical stage of breast cancer was significantly related to unhappiness at the time of occurrence and the idea of hereditary tendency. Stage of disease was not significantly related to other psychosocial variables tested. Advanced age and social position tend to be associated with advanced breast cancer. Significant relationships existed. between fear of dying of others and reason for seeking medical treatment, and fear of death of others and worry about things other than health and the ides of a hereditary tendency. No significant relationships existed between the Collet Lester Fear of Death Scales and other psychosocial variables tested. Fear of dying of self remained the strongest fear, Some tendencies to greater delay and fear of death and dying were presentBall State UniversityMuncie, IN 47306 en_US
dc.format.extent v, 119 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Breast -- Cancer. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Cancer -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Death. en_US
dc.subject.other Ball State University. Thesis (M.S.) en_US
dc.title Patient delay in breast cancer and fear of death and dying en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)--Ball State University, 1974. en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/416448 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Master's Theses [5330]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account