An experimental analysis of the transverse Zeeman intensity pattern of the 6647 A forbidden line of Hg II

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dc.contributor.advisor Hults, Malcom E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Stienecker, Craig A., 1947- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:14Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:14Z
dc.date.created 1974 en_US
dc.date.issued 1974
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1974 .S75 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180876
dc.description.abstract This thesis project has involved a study of forbidden radiation: a phenomenon studied in the discipline of Atomic Spectroscopy. Specifically, the forbidden spectral line 6647 A of Hg II was examined. This line is of mixed multipolarity in that it is composed of magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole radiation. Emission of these two multipolarities gives rise to an interference effect which is quite useful in determining the degree to which each multipolarity contributes to this forbidden line.The results of the study carried out here agree with the theoretical predictions made for this line. They indicate that less than two percent electric-quadrupole radiation is present in the line. This study of the interference effect demonstrates the importance of obtaining both the transverse and longitudinal views of the line relative to the direction of the magnetic field. Both views, it is felt, are necessary for experimental verification of the line's structure.
dc.format.extent iv, 63 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Atomic spectra. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Zeeman effect. en_US
dc.title An experimental analysis of the transverse Zeeman intensity pattern of the 6647 A forbidden line of Hg II en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/416925 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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