Nixon's National Security Council : innovations and implications

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dc.contributor.author Gossard, William en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:32Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:32Z
dc.date.created 1971 en_US
dc.date.issued 1971
dc.identifier LD2489.Z9 1971 .G67 en_US
dc.identifier.other P371b z en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181147
dc.description.abstract During his campaign for the presidency in 1968, Nixon promised "to restore the National Security Council (NSC) to its preeminent role in national security planning." Immediately after assuming office he announced the first important shifts in the process of making national security policy. The purpose of this research paper is to examine the effects of these changes upon the agencies of the Executive Branch and upon congressional policy.In examining Nixon’s Administration, one can evaluate the new direction of presidential decision-waking in foreign policy by discussing the innovations in organization and procedure.The projected research paper will follow this general format: introduction, brief history of organization and procedure under other Administrations, the present National Security Council model, and its operational control. The paper will then deal with implications and emerging problems of relations between the Department of State and NSC, the problem of the new options approach to the National Security Council system, and the problem of the Department of Defense and the National Security Council.Finally, the changes in the NSC system have clearly indicated a determination at the presidential level to control more directly the governmental agencies concerned with foreign and security policy and direct their energies to presidential purposes. Perhaps, at this time, some observations can be made upon whether or not the President's Innovations have bone far enough in their original intent to obtain more effective executive control over the budGet and the defense establishment, Further enquiry can be made whether or not the NSC system has gone too far in shifting the focus of policy-plan ping and operations from the Secretary of State and the Department of State to the President’s White House staff and the Assistant for National Security Affairs. en_US
dc.format.extent 56 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.title Nixon's National Security Council : innovations and implications en_US
dc.type Research paper (M.P.A.), 4 hrs. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.P.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/841797 en_US


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  • Research Papers [5068]
    Research papers submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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