Actual and desirable qualifications for entry-level workers as preceived by high school principals, business personnel managers, school board presidents, and school superintendents

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dc.contributor.advisor Drake, Thelbert L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Stephens, Jeffrey F. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:33Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:33Z
dc.date.created 1990 en_US
dc.date.issued 1990
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1990 .S74 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181163
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to provide educators with empirical information on the qualifications personnel managers expect from entry-level employees. The study also compared school officials' rankings of employment qualifications of high school graduates with qualifications found by business personnel managers when selecting entry-level workers.The data collection process involved a card sort technique utilizing two decks of cards. Surveys were mailed to Indiana public school superintendents, high school principals, public school board presidents, and business personnel managers. A total of 1924 surveys were mailed with 528 ranked surveys returned.Six null hypotheses were two-way comparisons of desired entry-level qualifications and current entry-level qualifications. Ten null hypotheses compared desired qualifications with current entry-level qualifications.There was little agreement among the respondents or respondent groups regarding the most desired or currently found entry-level qualifications. All respondent groups ranked science and technology, social and economic studies, and writing as the least found qualifications. Personnel managers ranked science and technology as the most desired entry-level qualification. School officials ranked this qualification as one of the least desired entry-level qualification.If educators are to prepare students to meet the challenges of entry-level employment, general expectations must be developed that are acceptable to a variety of employers. Only through collaborative efforts between business and school officials will entry-level qualifications be developed that have meaning to both groups. Until that collaboration occurs, educators willcontinue to rely on their own beliefs as they prepare students for entrance into the world of work. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Leadership
dc.format.extent 3, viii, 155 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh High school graduates -- Employment -- United States. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Employees -- Recruiting. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Employee selection. en_US
dc.title Actual and desirable qualifications for entry-level workers as preceived by high school principals, business personnel managers, school board presidents, and school superintendents en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/720396 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3194]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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