The success rate of vocationally handicapped individuals using psychometric data in job placement

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dc.contributor.advisor Dimick, Kenneth M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Stolarski, Alexander C. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:35Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:35Z
dc.date.created 1984 en_US
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1984 .S76 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181192
dc.description.abstract The intent of this research was to determine whether a complete psychological test battery was needed to determine if an individual is capable of successful job placement. If the stated goal of rehabilitation is to produce a successful rehabilitant, perhaps one test, or one subtest, out of the entire psychological battery is as efficient a predictor of success as an entire psychological workup. Thus, more time, money, and manpower can be spent in the rehabilitative process.Success was defined as a client being offered services, accepting such services, completing employment that was in line with the training received and maintaining that employment for a six-month period.Failure was defined as a client completing the entire program of testing, accepting offered services and not completing a program of vocational training.Data for the study was collected from adults who had voluntarily come to regional offices of the Indiana Division of Vocational Rehabilitation between the years 1979 and 1982. Statistical analyses were done on 199 clients. Most of the 199 rehabilitants were given the following battery of tests: Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Wide Range Achievement Test, Peabody Individual Achievement Test, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Self Directed Search or StrongCampbell Interest Inventory. It was decided not to use the Peabody Individual Achievement Test or the Strong Campbell Interest Inventory because they limited sample size.The psychometric data were all post hoc. They were analyzed by a Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and by Stepwise Regression. References were considered statistically significant at the .05 level. F at 1,200 degrees of freedom was 3.80.The Wide Range Achievement Test, subtest 4 (spelling grade level) was significant in best predicting success at the .05 level with an F score of 5.04524. The S scale (social interest) in the Self Directed Search was the next significant subtest in predicting success at the .05 level with an F score of 4.78224. The C scale (conventional) in the Self Directed Search was the next significant in best predicting success at the .05 level, with an F score of 6.17417. The best multiple predictors of success are subtest 4 of the WRAT (F, 4.956) combined with S (F, 10.900) and C (F, 8.588) scales of the SDS. The F level or tolerance level was insufficient for further computation. en_US
dc.format.extent 3, ix, 144 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Vocational rehabilitation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh People with disabilities -- Employment. en_US
dc.subject.other Indiana. Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. en_US
dc.title The success rate of vocationally handicapped individuals using psychometric data in job placement en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/422002 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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