The effects of parental divorce on adult children's expectations of their own future families

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dc.contributor.advisor Hutchinson, Roger L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Streicher, Pamela J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:37Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:37Z
dc.date.created 1993 en_US
dc.date.issued 1993
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1993 .S7 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181229
dc.description.abstract A large body of literature addresses the effects of divorce on children. Only a small part of this literature, however, addresses the effects of divorce on young adult children. This smaller body of literature addresses the emotional effects of divorce, the way adult children of divorce perceive their families of origin, and the intergenerational transmission of divorce hypothesis. The present study examined the nature of the relationship between parental divorce and its effects on the expectations of adults children's own future families.It is hypothesized that the structure of the family of origin plays a significant role in these expectations and that young adults from intact families will differ significantly from young adults from divorced families.One hundred sixty-seven students from a midwestern university participated in this study. Participants completed two versions of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scales III (FACES III). These two versions were for (1) the family of origin and (2) the future family. Participants also completed a demographic questionnaire. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) Family structure in the family of origin will predict expectations of young adults' own future familes; (2) Family functioning in the family of origin will predict expectations of young adults' own future families; (3) Family structure and family functioning in the family of origin will be related to each other in predicting the expectations of young adults' own future families.Contrary to expectations, only one of the three hypotheses was supported. Family functioning in the family of origin did predict expectations of family functioning in young adults' future families. This was true of both the cohesion and the adaptability contructs. Family structure did not predict expectations of young adults' own future families. An interaction of family structure and family functioning in the family of origin did not predict expectations of future families above and beyond what the two variables could predict independently. Implications of these findings and limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
dc.format.extent vi, 87 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Adult children of divorced parents -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Marriage -- Public opinion. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Divorce -- Public opinion. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Adult children of divorced parents -- Psychology. en_US
dc.title The effects of parental divorce on adult children's expectations of their own future families en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/862278 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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