An assessment of programs, activities and facilities for physically handicapped students at Ball State University

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dc.contributor.advisor Marconnit, George D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Thomsen, Gregory Lee, 1950- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:50Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:50Z
dc.date.created 1978 en_US
dc.date.issued 1978
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1978 .T56 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181413
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to assess programs, activities and facilities for physically handicapped students at Ball State University.Study participants included eighty-five individuals identified by University officials. Participants included fifty-six physically handicapped students, nine non-handicapped undergraduate students, ten administrators and ten faculty. Physically handicapped students were divided into seven disability groups including: (1) blind; (2) visually impaired; (3) deaf; (4) hearing impaired; (5) wheelchair confined; (6) limited ambulatory and (7) "other" disabilities.An interview assessment instrument was developed consisting of fifty items divided into five sections. Participants were interviewed for assessment of specific accommodations, general information, legislation, communication and attitudes concerning programs, activities and facilities for physically handicapped students at Ball State University. Fourteen trained interviewers conducted interviews with assigned participants.Physically handicapped students completed assessments from all five sections of the assessment instrument. Non-handicapped undergraduate students, administrators and faculty completed assessments from general information, legislation, communication and attitudes sections.Analyses of assessment data included-profile comparisons by number and percentage of participant responses. Response choices to assessment instrument items were: (1) a great degree; (2) moderate degree;(3) small degree; (4) none and (5) I don't know also collected from all study participants.The following summary of findings is based on analyses of assessment responses received from the study population.1. University transportation services were not as useful for handicapped students as non-handicapped students.2. Physical education facilities were not as useful for handicapped as for non-handicapped.3. Intramural sports provisions were not adequate for handicapped participation.4. Nobility impaired students reported difficulty with University door accommodations.5. Blind and visually impaired reported a greater need for brail and auditory information in public places at the University.6. Deaf and hearing impaired students reported a greater need for visual fire alarms and amplified telephones at the University.7. Wheelchair confined, limited ambulatory and "other" disability students reported little convenience in use of University parking facilities.8. Twenty of fifty-six handicapped students reported inconvenience in use of library card catalogs.9. Six wheelchair confined, one limited ambualtory, one blind, one visually impaired and three "other" disability students reported a need for more appropriate University Health Services.10. Handicapped students reported limited participation in social organizations and special interest groups.11. Twenty-two percent of the handicapped reported a greater need in consideration of handicapped for employment at the University.12. Limited ambulatory students reported a greater need for non-slip floors and surfaces at the University.13. All but five handicapped participants were not familiar with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.14. Participants reported that all institutions of higher education should be accessible to the handicapped.15. Non-handicapped persons reported that handicapped students had more personal adjustment problems than non-handicapped students.16. A greater number of handicapped than non-handicapped students reported that handicapped college graduates secure jobs as easily as non-handicapped college graduates.17. Thirty-six percent of the handicapped students had no information on which to base an opinion concerning career and vocational counseling services at Ball State University.18. Forty-seven percent of the handicapped students had no information on which to base an opinion concerning placement services at Ball State University.Study findings were dispersed to University officials for use in University accessibility development for the handicapped. en_US
dc.format.extent xii, 189 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh People with disabilities -- Education (Higher) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College facilities -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.other Ball State University -- Students. en_US
dc.title An assessment of programs, activities and facilities for physically handicapped students at Ball State University en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/225465 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3210]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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