An approach to the teaching of inference-making to junior high school literature readers

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dc.contributor.advisor Ransom, Peggy E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Thornburg, Joan M. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:50Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:50Z
dc.date.created 1981 en_US
dc.date.issued 1981
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1981 .T56 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181416
dc.description.abstract This study was designed to determine the effect of written and oral guidance to drawing inferences related to a short story upon performance on an instrument constructed to assess inference-making ability of eighth grade students. The sample consisted of 194 subjects--members of nine English classes in three rural Indiana schools. Students who scored more than two years above or below grade level in reading achievement tests were not included in the sample.The reading material consisted of a short story selection from a literature anthology, a guide to inferences in the story, and a ten-item multiple-choice inference test. The inference guide and test were constructed specifically for use in this study.Three null hypotheses were tested for significance at the .01 level of confidence to ascertain the effect of a pre-reading guide on inferential reading comprehension, and accepted:1. There is no significant difference in inference making achievement between students having a pre-reading oral guide read by the teacher and students having no guidance in inferencing2. There is no significant difference in inference making achievement between students having a pre-reading oral guide read by the teacher and a pre-reading written guide read silently by students3. There is no significant difference in inference making ability between students having a pre-reading written guide to read silently and students having no guidance in inferencingAll hypotheses were accepted at the .01 level; however, significance was indicated at the .05 level when a comparison was made among the schools, and at the .001 level among teachers. It was concluded from the results of analysis of variance that the pre-reading techniques utilized in this study had no statistically significant effect on the performance score on a measure on inferential reading comprehension of the eighth grade students. Further analysis of data supported the educational principles that the teacher, administrator, and school reading program exert important influences on student achievement in reading and comprehension. en_US
dc.format.extent 2, v, 191 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Inference. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading (Secondary) en_US
dc.title An approach to the teaching of inference-making to junior high school literature readers en_US
dc.title.alternative Junior high school literature readers. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/251886 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3145]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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