A study of the effects of self-instruction and alternate response training on oppositional behaviors

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dc.contributor.advisor Bennett, Carson M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Vannatta, Terrie Lynn en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:32:05Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:32:05Z
dc.date.created 1990 en_US
dc.date.issued 1990
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1990 .V3 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181630
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the effects of self-instruction and alternate response training on oppositional behavior. Four oppositional adolescent females in a community-based residential treatment facility were taught to self-instruct alternate responses to their oppositional behaviors by participating in a series of Behavior Skills Training (BST) sessions. Subjects were required to role-play situations which subjects indicated evoke the targeted behaviors, that is, swearing/namecalling, noncompliance with rules, and noncompliance with requests. These self-reported situations were a major component in developing the BST. A multiple baseline design across behaviors was used. As an additional experimental control, two nontreatment subjects were included in the data analysis. Although trend analyses were conducted, variability in the data precluded the possibility of drawing conclusions based on statistical correlation. However, functional analyses of the treatment effects indicated that the BST was effective in reducing the oppositional behaviors of the subjects in the treatment group. Thus these results support the efficacy of using self-instruction and alternate response training procedures to reduce the occurrence of oppositional behavior in adolescent females. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Psychology
dc.format.extent vii, 115 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Behavior modification. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Juvenile delinquency -- Prevention. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Teenage girls. en_US
dc.title A study of the effects of self-instruction and alternate response training on oppositional behaviors en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/720349 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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