The effect of athletic participation on school discipline

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dc.contributor.author Hudson, Scott B. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:32:41Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:32:41Z
dc.date.created 1999 en_US
dc.date.issued 1999
dc.identifier LD2489.Z9 1999 .H83 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/182126
dc.description.abstract Discipline and drug abuses were rated as the number one and two top problems facing schools in the last two decades and must be improved. There is serious doubt cognitive experiences alone will solve or decrease the rate at which these are causing the increased dropout rates. Interscholastic athletic programs perceived in many instances as costly frills could be, in fact, a large part of the solution to many of the problems that are invading schools today (Smith, 1994). Wes-Del High School is a rural, central Indiana school of 302 students in grades 9-12. The school was selected for the study of the effect of athletic participation on high school discipline for the 1998-99 school year. The goal of this study is to investigate if there is statistical data to support if athletic participation has an effect on high school discipline. Discipline referrals were coded and broken down according to non-athlete referrals compared to athlete referrals. The number of male athlete referrals and female athlete referrals was also evaluated. Records were kept of when most athletes' referrals occurred and by what sport or specific teams. Based on data collected from this study, athletes were less likely to have received discipline referrals by a two to one ratio compared to non-athletes. The study also concluded that female athletes received significantly less of the total discipline referrals than male athletes. Females received 25% of the total discipline referrals compared to 75% of the total discipline referrals received by male athletes. In this study, there was evidence that supported female athletes received less discipline referrals in-season than out-of-season but, male athletes received more discipline referrals in-season than out-of-season. The results of the study provide evidence that schools should be encouraged to evaluate the benefits of athletic participation on school discipline. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent iv, 26 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.title The effect of athletic participation on school discipline en_US
dc.type Research paper (M.A.), 3 hrs. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1124647 en_US


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  • Research Papers [5068]
    Research papers submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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