The effects of detraining on glucose metabolism in the adipocytes of female rats

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dc.contributor.advisor Craig, Bruce W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Martin, Gary A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:33:46Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:33:46Z
dc.date.created 1984 en_US
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1984 .M38 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/182934
dc.description.abstract This study was done to examine the effects of detraining upon the metabolism of glucose by the rats. Thirty-nine female Wister rats were separated into three groups: trained, detrained, and sedentary. The training protocol consisted of swimming 6 hours/day for eight weeks. The detrained groups were then sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after training. The parametrial fat pads were removed and digested into isolated cells. The cell volumes, cell concentrations, and glucose oxidation rates (radioactively labeled C-1 or C-6 glucose) were measured. The results showed that those adaptations in the fat cell brought about by exercise, i.e., 120% decreases adipocyte volume and increased glucose oxidation rates in both pentose phosphate (C-1) cycle and the glycolysis/citric acid cycles, return to the sedentary control levels by 14 days detraining.Ball State UniversityMuncie, IN 47306 en_US
dc.format.extent iv, 63 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Adipose tissues. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Glucose -- Metabolism. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Rats -- Physiology. en_US
dc.subject.other Ball State University. Thesis (M.S.) en_US
dc.title The effects of detraining on glucose metabolism in the adipocytes of female rats en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)--Ball State University, 1984. en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/225474 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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